Why do people travel to dark tourism destinations?

Sometimes it’s a way to challenge yourself and broaden your mind. For many, this includes an element of dark tourism. Not only does visiting these macabre sites give visitors a thrill, but they’re also a way to pay respects to a darker past. That being said, dark tourism requires travelers to tread carefully.

Why do people visit dark tourism destinations?

Most people visit dark places wanting to pay their respects. As history shows, people have done it in the past for entertainment. There are probably many today who do it for the thrills (war zones might come to mind).

Why is dark tourism so important?

Dark tourism experiences can shift mindsets, challenge assumptions and maybe even reverse prejudices — which inherently makes them important. Dark tourism sites also help visitors to internalize the scale and scope of pivotal moments in human history.

Who is interested in dark tourism?

Travelers interested in dark tourism experiences come from various age groups, including seniors as well as young students. Some of them are attracted by cultural and historical aspects of the places, others seek more nature-bound information.

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Why is it called dark tourism?

The term ‘Dark Tourism’ was first coined in 1996 by John Lennon (no, not that one) and Malcolm Foley, professors at Glasgow Caledonian University in the Department of Hospitality, Tourism & Leisure Management. Dark tourism refers to tourism to sites of mass tragedy and death.

What is dark tourism explain?

Dark tourism refers to visiting places where some of the darkest events of human history have unfolded. That can include genocide, assassination, incarceration, ethnic cleansing, war or disaster — either natural or accidental.

What is dark tourism examples?

Destinations of dark tourism include castles and battlefields such as Culloden in Scotland and Bran Castle and Poienari Castle in Romania; former prisons such as Beaumaris Prison in Anglesey, Wales and the Jack the Ripper exhibition in the London Dungeon; sites of natural disasters or man made disasters, such as …

What is dark tourism list destination that engage with dark tourism?

Popular dark tourism attractions include Auschwitz, Chernobyl and Ground Zero. Lesser known dark tourism attractions might include cemeteries, zombie-themed events or historical museums.

What can we learn from dark tourism?

Dark Tourism Gets You Out of Your Comfort Zone

Learning about the bad parts of history are just as much a part of the travel experience as seeing beautiful buildings. It helps us grow as people, and it allows us to better understand and appreciate where we are.

Why is dark tourism controversial?

Some have argued it’s voyeuristic and inappropriate. For instance, local residents expressed anger at people stopping to take selfies outside Grenfell Tower in the months following the fire, in which 72 people died.

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Is dark tourism good or bad?

The most common criticism of dark tourism is that it exploits human suffering. Operators can exploit these sites to make money or simply to provide entertainment. This disrespects the victims of the event. This type of behavior may be unethical.

Where does Dark Tourism occur?

The number one dark tourism attraction is Robben Island Prison in Cape Town. This was a maximum-security prison where Nelson Mandella spent most of his 27-year imprisonment. Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, tours of the facility are led by ex-prisoners.

What’s so dark about dark tourism?

Tourist studies scholars have sought to differentiate tours of the picturesque, the romantic, and the sublime from those of the disgusting, the abject, and the macabre. … This essay identifies and interrogates the scholarly and political assumptions behind labeling tourist destinations at sites of death as ‘dark’.